earth-lt
GET-header-rt

DNA Sequencing and Scientific Bias in the Peer Review Process

Why We Still Need to Keep an Open Mind

Compiled by Global ET Research

 

Is the human genome completely sequenced? Yes and No

“...within the limits of today’s technology, the human genome is as complete as it can be. Small gaps that are unrecoverable in any current sequencing method remain, amounting for about 1 percent of the gene-containing portion of the genome, or euchromatin. New technologies will have to be invented to obtain the sequence of these regions.” Source


What if the DNA that caused the physical attributes of the Atacama Humanoid and/or the Star Child lie within that 1% unknown? How can geneticists locate Extraterrestrial DNA if they don’t know what they’re looking for?



“Research on bias in peer review

...suggests that peer review is social in ways that go beyond the social categories to which authors and reviewers belong: Relationships between individuals in the process impact outcomes (e.g., affiliation bias), and individuals make decisions conditioned on beliefs about what others value (e.g., publication bias).”

“Consider, for example, how the editor’s relationships and beliefs about other actors may have an impact on his/her decisions. On the basis of previous experience with reviewers, the editor may differentially value and preferentially assign reviewers to manuscripts, which may alter final recommendations. Frequent or highly sought authors to the journal may develop a privileged relationship with the editor and with potential reviewers. Editors may feel peer pressure when evaluating manuscripts submitted by frequent reviewers and editorial board members (Lipworth, Kerridge, Carter, & Little, 2011). The readership may function as an invisible hand in the selection of authors and manuscript content, since the editor will need to be cognizant of the needs and wants of the marketplace. An editor may also be influenced by her/his relationship with the editorial board and/or publisher (commercial, academic, or society). The editor’s strategy or vision for the journal may have a bearing on which manuscripts are reviewed and ultimately accepted for publication. As Chubin and Hackett (1990, p. 92) note, “[t]he journal editor occupies a delicate position between the author and reviewers, alternating among the roles of wordsmith and gatekeeper, caretaker and networker, literary agent and judge.” - Source

 

Steps for Evaluating Scientific Papers

Make certain the paper is published in a legitimate, peer reviewed journal;

Read the original study yourself and don’t rely on catchy titles or abstracts to make a decision;

Obtain necessary background knowledge on your subject matter;

 

Compare the journal or site’s overall expertise and see if the study matches the messaging of the journal/site;

Check the authors for their expertise and conflicts of interest;

See if the journal’s impact factor matches the paper’s claims;

Review how the study was designed, conducted, and if it was analyzed appropriately;

Make sure the paper follows standard conventions of scientific writing;

Research whether the study is consistent with other studies similar in nature;

Check for rebuttals and other scientifically based points of view.

 

SPIEGEL Interview with Craig Venter: ‘We Have Learned Nothing ...

In a SPIEGEL interview, genetic scientist Craig Venter discusses the 10 years he spent sequencing the human genome, why we have learned so little from it a decade on and the potential for mass production of artificial life forms that could be used to produce fuels and other resources.

 

An Epidemic of False Claims: Competition and Conflicts of Interest Distort Too many Medical Findings

 

Top of Page


The Atacama Humanoid

 

The Star Child Skull


Is the human genome completely sequenced? Yes and No

“...within the limits of today’s technology, the human genome is as complete as it can be. Small gaps that are unrecoverable in any current sequencing method remain, amounting for about 1 percent of the gene-containing portion of the genome, or euchromatin. New technologies will have to be invented to obtain the sequence of these regions.” Source

 

SPIEGEL Interview with Craig Venter: ‘We Have Learned Nothing ...

In a SPIEGEL interview, genetic scientist Craig Venter discusses the 10 years he spent sequencing the human genome, why we have learned so little from it a decade on and the potential for mass production of artificial life forms that could be used to produce fuels and other resources.

 

Steven Greer’s Atacama Evidence

 

An Epidemic of False Claims: Competition and Conflicts of Interest Distort Too many Medical Findings

 

 

 

 

© 1993-2018 Global ET Research/alienjigsaw.com All Rights Reserved

Disclaimer & Terms of Use